Its been a while since I did a new edition to Kickstarter Watch. Actually, its been so long since I did one of these, is that what I called it? I digress as that is what we are calling it now. There have been a couple games to pop up on Kickstarter the last few months that we went crazy for here at Late Night Players. Academy Games launched Agents of Mayhem: Pride of Babylon, followed by Monolith Board Games launched the impressive Batman: Gotham City Chronicles. For the record, while I did not comment on the message feed for it or approve of any of their bullying, I am Team Batcow all the way.

But we aren’t here to talk about those games. No, of course. It is spring time which means its time for another CMoN Kickstarter. This time, we’re talking an interstellar journey in a futuristic update to their classic Zombicide franchise- Zombicide: Invader.

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Look at all the pretty new plastic…(insert Homer Simpson drooling sound effect)

From their Kickstarter page:

“Zombicide: Invader is a standalone cooperative board game for 1 to 6 players, taking the trademark Zombicide action into the far reaches of space! Players control a group of Survivors trying to defend their remote mining outpost from a swarm of infected aliens controlled by the game itself. The more experience and power the Survivors earn, the more Xenos invade the facility!

This sci-fi interpretation of Zombicide is as sleek as ever, playing fast and furious. The rules have been optimized to reduce setup time and make the game flow quickly, focusing the action on the struggle between the Survivors and the Xenos.”

If the idea of Zombicide in space wasn’t enough to get people excited, looking at these minis:

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I wish my painting skills were half as good as this!

The classic Zombicide dashboard even got a bit of a futuristic upgrade:

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Taking a cue from Black Plaque, the new plastic dashboards are beautifully laid out.

At the time of this write up, the game is already funded multiple times over. Originally seeking $250,000 for production, the game is sitting at $1,182,662. This means they’ve unlocked a plethora of stretch goals, as well. With 24 stretch goals unlocked, they are sitting on a 25th goal of $1,240,00.

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The 25th stretch goal and a face only a mother could love.

Currently, there are only two pledge levels: Civilian and Soldier. The Civilian pledge is $100, and includes the core game, exclusive miniature and all applicable stretch goals. The Soldier pledge is $150, and it includes the core game, Black Ops expansion, two exclusive miniatures and all applicable stretch goals.

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The Black Ops expansion includes 6 new survivors, a new abomination and 3 new tiles. It also includes 6 additional dashboards for 12 player games.

So here is where I am going to have to be a little negative, and I really, truly do not want to be.

The game, for all intents and purposes, looks like it should be a fun and exciting addition to the Zombicide family. However, as has become the tradition with all CMoN products, its honestly about what the add after the fact that make these campaigns exciting and worth participating in. Zombicide Black Plaque: The Greene Horde had some of the most amazing miniature stretch goals and add-ons one could possibly ask for. Each miniature was a work of art, amazing homage and made unlocking it a celebration. I don’t get that feeling with this campaign. At least so far.

Every other survivor is a parody/homage, while the in-betweens are original characters. The art style, while beautiful and inspiring, does not translate well to showing off the parody in figure form. The original survivors, minus possibly one or two, are boring and lack any real character. This does not go for the aliens, however. The creatures are beautiful and if I could swap out the original design survivors for more of the creatures, I   probably would if I weren’t such a completist.

To top it off, especially after such a quick and amazing first 30 minutes the campaign was live, things are slowing down. I don’t know if it is just Zombicide fatigue, easy considering that Greene Horde hasn’t even completely shipped yet, or if others are finding aspects of the game as uninspiring as me, but the pace is a crawl at this point. I am left wondering if it wouldn’t have served them better to have called the game something else and treated it as a totally new and original IP as opposed to a sequel in a long running series. Plus, Xenocide would have made for a killer title!

In the end though, regardless of how much I am concerned or left underwhelmed, they have me for a Soldier pledge. I learnt a long time ago that if I want a CMoN game, get it via Kickstarter or else my collector’s OCD will kick in. I’m looking at you, Arcadia Quest. Hopefully we’ll see some sort of cool and amazing add-ons to get the stretch goals running again.

Until next time, keep your dice warm and happy gaming!

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Everyone knows about my on-again-off-again relationship with Magic The Gathering. I spent most of my middle school and high school days bouncing back and forth between Pokemon and Yu-Gi-Oh!, but every once in a while Magic would slip in. The last time we actively tried to really get into Magic would have been around Core Set 2010 and the Divine vs Demonic two-player deck, then again when Dragons of Tarkir dropped in 2015.

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Admit it, Ojutai was dropping the sickest mixtape of 2015.

This relationship came to a head in 2017 when, after many attempts to get us into the format and several trips to GenCon, we finally broke into the Commander (or EDH) format. I went with the Arcane Wizardry deck, while Rob went with Feline Ferocity. The other two decks were chosen by two others in our main group. Laster that year, we’d add the Commander Anthology to our collection.

Since then, I think I’ve played more games of Magic in nine months than I have in the last ten years. Things got really bad when Ixalan/Rivals of Ixalan came out. Dinosaurs and pirates are a volatile combination. We attended actual prerelease events, even buying a full box of Rivals. The bug is pretty bad, though we’ve kept ourselves contempt with Commander. I think in large part to it being the only format the majority of our play group will only play.

This all brings me to the point of this post: I finally sat down and built my first from-scratch Commander deck. We have six decks prior, but they were all pre-constructed decks to which we’ve made modest modifications to over the last several months. The most edited deck probably being the Heavenly Inferno (featuring Kaalia) from the Anthology collection. For my first original build, I decided to go with one of the reasons I’m so big into Magic again – dinosaurs!

Aside from dinosaurs being one of the big reasons I loved Ixalan so much, they seemed like one of the easier modern types to go with. I was always a fan of aggro decks in the past and the dinosaurs introduced fit that bill perfectly. There are some nice little combos hidden in some of them, but for the most part they hit hard and hit hard fast. The first thing I had to decide on, however, was which dinosaur to use for my Commander. I narrowed it down to two:

These are the two baddest dinosaurs in the Ixalan schoolyard, with Gishath hailing from Ixalan and Zacama from Rivals of Ixalan. They both offer a tremendous amount of power for their costs, yet both offer completely different play styles. Zacama blocks anything and everything while untapping all the resources to call him out. Gishath, on the other hand, can attack the turn summoned and potentially flood the board with dinosaurs to give your opponent a headache.

Ultimately, I decided to run the tri-headed terror and Primal Calamity, Zacama. Gishath’s ability to swarm the board is nice, but if he gets destroyed and goes back to the Command Zone, it’ll cost you resources better spent elsewhere. If Zacama gets destroyed, send it back to your command zone with no worries. Why? Next turn, summon it again and then untap. Once you have enough mana on the board to bring Zacama out the first time, it is basically a free 9/9 slaughter house whenever you need it. To add insult to injury, the mana you untapped can then be used for three amazing effects.

The rest of the build I went with is a bit…unique. As I stated before, my on-again-off-again relationship with Magic over the years has left me with a unique collection. I have cards from several different sets, but not complete access to the must have cards for 99% of Commander builds. As such, you improvise until you go to something like GenCon or you hit up TCGPlayer and single out what you need.

I don’t want to brag, but I think the deck comes out fairly well. Over the weekend, it was played 6 times. With the exception of one game where it stalled, it performed extremely well the remaining five times. Each game was multiplayer with 3 or more players. I can say with some fine tuning it could be a great contender. A big MVP of the deck is:

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So much potential…

With Zacama, as well as a couple other cards in my build, I have a decent amount of life gain. In one game, the deck was able to build up to 98 life. Tapping Sanctum of the Sun for anything over base life is amazing in a deck that doesn’t have an infinite mana build. Better yet is that Sanctum is a land, which means if Zacama somehow gets destroyed, it can untap it for even more land! Rob managed to pull that off, tapping it the first time for 60 red and then 60 white. Just using it for Zacama’s abilities, that’s +60 life and 60 points of damage across all of our creatures. That’s an opponents’ board wiped plus setting up for even more mana for the next turn.

Of course, the cost is losing five cards exiled with Azor specifically. That’s five turns of a major target on that Artifact.

I’m super excited to see Dominaria on the horizon. The spoilers have been making me drool a little, mainly for what it could possibly add to my Wizard deck. I’m not sure what could or could not be making their way into this deck, but I’m definitely looking to see what older cards I could possibly add to the dinosaur deck.

So, for long time Commander players, what are some need to have cards I should be on the look out for? Have you ever tried a dinosaur deck yet? What worked well and what kept you from having fun? Sign off in the comments below and let us know!

Until next time, keep your dice warm and happy gaming.

 

Well, the title says in all. However, if you’d care to read their own words from their interview with ICv2 at the GAMMA Trade Show:

“It’s important as publishers, and as studios and developers, as we start to get our feet under us to take a real hard look as how it is and why it is we use Kickstarter as a business,” he said.  “We have a great community we’ve been able to build up over time, but we’ve come to recognize that in our time working and developing in Kickstarter that you run the risk, as a business, of your eyes getting too big for the plate.  You build big projects.  You want to be ambitious.  You want to go after all of this opportunity to give your customers all the things they want.  We have gone through and redesigned whole products from scratch based on the feedback we get.  We’ve added time to our time frames, everybody thinking that it’s OK.”

“But the added toxicity, …the way that it’s swung online has made us shy away from wanting to even be a part of it.  I don’t think that it’s responsible for any of our external business partners to have to be exposed to that. It’s not responsible for me to expose my employees to that.  It’s not responsible for me to expose my brands to that.”

If you’d like to read the original article, click here.

I try to be unbiased in what I write on here, while trying to keep any emotional outbursts to a minimum, but you’ll have to excuse me…ARE THEY SERIOUS?!

The “toxicity” they are referring to is one of their own creation. Lack of transparency and communication on their projects, ties up with a nice little bow of constant delays, was the catalyst for any and all “toxic” remarks they receive.

Presently, I have only ever backed one Ninja Division Kickstarter. That was Relic Knights 2.0. The entire campaign read like a glorified preorder system. I was fine with that. I had just gotten done learning the game from a couple starters I had won via a contest over at Beasts of War. I wanted more. I went in for the Relic Knight pledge because they had some gorgeous models that were exclusive to that tier.

The game was to be shipped via 3 waves: Wave 1 – Late Summer 2017, Wave 2 – Fall/Winter 2017, Wave 3 -By end of February 2018. We are now three days out from April 2018. A delay in a project is par for the course with Kickstarters, but they are just now entering production on the miniatures per their most recent update on the Kickstarter page (Update #66- Productions Minis and Unit Cards: March 23, 2018).

At this point, I want to request a full refund. However, with same said update, they have also ended their refund period. Funny this interview was posted four short days after that update. I digress, however. Their own Kickstarter page lays out their refund policy, though:

REFUND POLICY

Refund requests made within 60 days of the campaign’s end are made through Stripe, directly to your credit card, fees included.

Refunds requested after 60 days are made through Paypal only, less Kickstarter and payment processing fees, which we cannot get back.

No refunds are possible if requested eight weeks before the Kickstarter’s actual shipping date, since at that point we have already begun packaging pledges.

Ultimately, at the end of the day, I’m just an artist and a hobby gamer. I know little to nothing about mass manufacturing. However, if the miniatures just went into production, that means they won’t be hitting that first full week of May shipping timeline (8 weeks from the time of this writing). Granted, as I said, I have know extensive knowledge of manufacturing. Maybe they will. Then again, if they don’t or aren’t aiming for the window, then we should still be allowed refunds.

I wanted to give this game a chance. Everything about Relic Knights checks the boxes that make me excited to play a game: great art, great lore and great mechanics. However, I cannot in good faith or conscience recommend another game by a company so lacking in integrity or common customer service skills like those displayed by Ninja Division these last several months. I welcome anyone from the company to correct me, to show me that your games (and by extension your company) deserve nothing but the utmost respect from us. However, until that day comes, I will be sitting here patiently awaiting my long over due game.

Until next time, folks, keep your dice warm and happy gaming.

I was trying to avoid this but it was bound to happen:

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A local game/comic shop got in a small shipment for the launch of Fantasy Flight Games’ new Star Wars game. By time I got there, they’d sold all but one of the few core sets they got in. Deciding one can never have too many miniature games in their collection, I pulled the trigger and spent the day assembling the Stormtroopers and Rebel Scum.

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For all intents and purposes, they were a rather easy and straight forward build. They included a somewhat handy assembly guid in the rule book. The Speeder Bikes were probably the biggest issue. The guide clearly shows a peg and groove for the peddles on each bike, but there is no suck peg or groove. So, just a heads up, add the peddles last after placing the Stormtroopers on the bikes.

Going through the rest of the box, it seems like the game will play somewhat similarly to FFG’s other Star Wars’ games, like Imperial Assault and Attack Wing. Hopefully, when I get the game to the table sometime soon we’ll know for certain. I’m being cautious with it, though. There are already a handful of expansions released, including a gorgeous AT-ST (Albeit a gorgeous, $50 AT-ST):

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I want to get a couple games in before going crazy. I’ve yet to find a miniatures game that I could find myself going headfirst into, organized play and all. I could see Star Wars Legion being that game though. The miniatures are gorgeous. The company has a fantastic track record. It’s Star Wars, so the lore already has its hooks in my soul. Plus, the ideas floating around in my head for custom boards…

Anyways, I hope to have a game report sometime soon, like I said. Until then, keep your dice warm and happy gaming!

On Wednesday, Bushiroad held a live stream discussing the future of the beloved trading card game franchise. The speculation was high on what we could possibly see. Would there be a new anime? Would we see the arrival of a new clan? What new mechanics would be showcased? With all eyes on the screen, Bushiroad announced something that I think very, very few would have expected:

They are honestly relaunching the anime?

Did not see that one coming.

The relaunch, however, does appear to set closer to the manga this time. Though I never read the manga, I can’t say I’m completely upset by this. I have fond memories of binge watching the original seasons through Asia Circuit and those three seasons essentially making me want to play the game. There is a major change, though, in the introduction of a new mechanic (seen briefly in the trailer when Kai rides into his avatar, Dragonic Overlord) known as Imaginary Gift.

The Imaginary Gift mechanic grants one of three possible “gifts” to the player that triggers the gift. The first adds an additional front rear guard that gets a +10,000 attack on that player’s turn. The second gift grants up to a +20,000 attack, depending on the number of circles with the gift. The final gift grants a bonus perfect guard to their hand.

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Triggers also received an upgrade. All triggers going forward will have a power increase to +10,000 from the original +5,000. Stand triggers are taking a back seat for the new Front trigger that will give all front row units +10,000.

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Aside from the new mechanic, we are getting two new trial decks that follow the theme of the reboot. The original trial decks were Blaster Blade and Overlord based and these are the same!

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The first booster launch of the rebooted series will be based on the original Vanguard super team, Team Q4! Featuring Royal Paladins, Kagero, Oracle Think Tank and Nova Grappler.

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I can’t help but get a little giddy seeing any new artwork featuring Q4. Plus, that Alfred looks amazing.

We also got a bit of a look into the future of the set releases. It looks like up through September will only cover the original clans from Cardfight Vanguard. As a primarily Link Joker and Shadow Paladin player, the lack of new cards will be rather taxing. However, I’ll definitely be taking the time to try out new clans until the releases.

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Now…the most interesting thing to the actual game that isn’t related to the lore per say. Bushiroad announced a new tournament format structure.

Standard Format will feature only the newest released cards, essentially rotating out the original and G-era cards. Premium Format will allow for all eras of cards, from the original launch to the newest releases. G Format will only feature the cards released prior to the relaunched sets.

The last few days have seen post after post online discussing the merits of the format changes and asking players which formats they’ll be partaking in. Honestly, I’m going to be sticking to Premium Format for the foreseeable future. I’m not stupid, though. Standard Format is going to be the focus of Bushiroad as it allows for new players to more easily get into the game. That being said, I am giving it until the beginning of 2019 that the Premium Format series will be sidelined to secondary events before being phased out completely.

That being said, it’s never been easier to get in on the game now (at least not since the game originally launched). That can only be good for the health of the game and the community.

Finally, they left off with a really nice surprise: a mobile game!

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I’ve been an avid player of Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links since the game’s launch. I’ve said on multiple occasions that the layout of the game would have leant itself perfectly to CardFight Vanguard. Looking at the screen grab they posted, and short video, the game looks straight up like a Duel Links clone. So much so that I wonder if Konami is getting a developmental fee with this game’s release.

Thats not a bad thing, mind you. Ever since the cancelation of CardFight Online, players have been chomping at the bit for a digital, on the go version of the game for some time. As long as the game is kept up with and has a passable player-vs-player mode, then this is going to be a huge release for Bushiroad.

All in all, I was pleasantly surprised with Bushi’s attempt at shaking things up. They are opening up the gates to make it easier to get new players in with a streamlined reboot and new mechanics. With the new mobile game, they give players the ability to play even if they don’t have a community or local game store support.

The game is in an exciting place and I, for one, cannot wait to see how it all unfolds.

Until next time, keep your dice warm and happy gaming.

Over the weekend, I attended my first official event of 2018: a Munchkin CCG launch event. For those unaware, Munchkin CCG is the collectible card game version of the immensely popular line of games by Steve Jackson Games. Unveiled at a past GAMMA event, the game has finally released at retail stores across the country. Is the game a smash hit, or just another fly by trading card game? Lets find out.

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Munchkin CCG display at GenCon 2017. Photo from ICv2.

Announced in 2016, the Munchkin CCG is a new game based on the Munchkin franchise. In the original series of games, players take turns exploring dungeons, fighting monsters and scoring loot, all while potentially stabbing one another in the back. The CCG removes the dungeon exploring aspect and replaces it with the heroes now hiring the monsters they once defeated to defeat other heroes instead.

The Basics:

To begin with, each player needs to have a deck of 40 cards and 1 hero. Like all trading card games, Steve Jackson Games released three 2-player starter decks for its initial launch. The three are Cleric vs Thief, Ranger vs Warrior and Wizard vs Bard. For their first print run, all 2-player starters include a free booster pack.

Aside from the hero card, there are five additional types of cards found in the game’s booster packs:

– Ally: These are sidekick type characters who aid you with special abilities and can take the brunt of your damage.

– Loot: Loot comes in several forms, mostly armor and weapons. These will help you fight your opponents’ hired monsters.

– Locations: Cards that effect the entire field.

– Mischief: These cards are played like Instances and Sorceries.

– Monsters: These are your creatures that you hire during your turns to damage your opponent.

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The initial launch booster set, simply titled Munchkin Collectible Card Game. Combined with the starter cards, the Core of Set 1 contains an astounding 319 cards. Something that Steve Jackson Games did a fantastic job on is that most of your rarer cards are simply extended art cards of existing cards. On the other hand, something that they are doing poorly with, is that the booster packs are extremely limited with the first wave. After that, the plans for reprint are slim to none. This is creating an artificial demand for an untested collectible card game, one that may not survive its first year.

Game Play:

Each player takes alternating turns playing out three phases: Warmup, the aptly named Munchkining, and then the Cooldown.

Your Warmup phase is your standard fare beginning of turn/up keep mechanics. You unclip your “Run Away” token, stand any committed cards (called “zap” and “unzap”), collect your stash and draw a card. The Stash is an interesting mechanic in that any monsters that were not destroyed in your previous attacks go to a sort of waiting room. In this zone, during your opponent’s turn, they can play cards that can potentially destroy said monsters. Any monsters that are not destroyed then get added to your hand for another round of monster fights.

During the Munchkining phase is were the bulk of the action is. Utilizing a fairing interesting cheating system, players lay a card face down in the Dangerous Monster Zone (or DMZ) as well as commit a certain amount of gold (the game’s currency/resource) to the face down card. The key here is that you don’t necessarily have to even lay down a monster here, you could bluff your way to make your opponent run away. They do so by flipping a Run Away token, it’d now show a Limp Away icon. If they don’t call your bluff and decide to fight it, the face down card is moved to the Stash and your gold is returned to your pile. Should they call your bluff and you were cheating, you lose take a point of damage and the card is placed in the Stash face down while the gold returns to your pile.

Should you not cheat and it is a monster, then a fight plays out. Each monster has an Attack and Defense, while some will also have an ability or effect. Before any cards are revealed, however, your opponent has the option to commit any weapons or allies to the fight. Allies can take the brunt of the damage while the weapons help destroy the monster. If the monster survives, it is moved to the Stash face up with all damage in tact. All committed allies and weapons return to your opponent’s side of the board, also called their Horde.

These steps are repeated over and over until the active player is done Also, during the Munchkining phase is when players would equip any loot, such as weapons and armor, or recruit allies, as well as play new locations. Every loot card has a star featuring a number. The total of all these numbers cannot exceed your current level, either.

The final step is called Cooldown. During this phase, the active player only performs two steps outside of any effects that may trigger during this phase. First they Level Up. You start the game on Level 1, but each turn you go up a Level. Like in the main game of Munchkin, players go to Level 10. However, you cannot pass this level, nor is their a victory condition for achieving this level. Then players collect gold equal to their current level. You may never collect more gold than what your level is.

Having the resource gathering step at the end of the turn presents an interesting and strategic element to the game. Do you use all your resources playing Mischief and other cards to defend against your opponents onslaught? If you do, you’re left with fewer gold coins in which to hire monsters on your turn. Do you save the gold then? Save the gold and hope they use all their resources so they have nothing to defend with.

Presentation:

The art in the game is what one would expect from the likes of a Munchkin game. That isn’t to say it is bad by any means, it can just be an acquired taste. That being said, the alternate full art cards can be rather gorgeous looking. The over all designs, however, look amateurish. I suspect this is by design, though. A personal nitpick I have is the lack of any foiling. While I get that that may not bother a lot of people, foiling has always been a quick look way of telling a card’s rarity. The current set of the cards have only two ways to tell a rarity: art or a tiny letter in the middle of the card, at the very bottom, with the card’s set number.

The additional components included in the starter are generic looking tokens marked 1 or 5. These are to represent your gold, as well as keep track of your Hero’s damage. Also included is a single, black d6 for the random cards that require a die rolls. There are two larger tokens, marked Run Away and Limp Away. The art is cute and easily distinguishable at a glance. Finally, there are two level counters featuring a Munchkin dragon. Again, nothing fancy or special, but gets the job done. At the tournament I attended, and even in my own home games, the use of other counters and dice have made their way to replace the cardboard components.

One thing I’ve always loved about the Munchkin franchise is their love of parodying other games. This is even more true with the CCG as they take great care in poking fun and parodying the whole trading card game genre as a whole. The rarity system has your normal fare of Commons (C), Uncommon (UC) and Rares (R). However, they also have: Very Rare (V), Promo (FOMO, or Fear of Missing Out), We Destroyed Most of These (W) and These Don’t Really Exist (T). Since Tapped is a copyrighted term by Wizards of the Cost for Magic the Gathering, they use Zap and Unzap. Then borrowing a certain game winning card set from the popular Yu-Gi-Oh! game, they have their own in “Explodia, the Trademarked One”.

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My grandfather’s deck has no pathetic cards, Kaiba, but it does have…Exodi…I mean, Explodia, the Trademarked One!

Organized Play and the Game’s Future:

Currently, the game has drafted and constructed format play for local game shops, with special limited edition prize cards. Three out of the four are merely alternate art, neutral monsters that any player can use regardless of their hero. The fourth card is a draft exclusive Hero card, Goldfish Wanderer. The card has an interesting effect, but over all it isn’t nearly as powerful as the main set heroes. I’m never going to complain about tournament prize cards, especially ones that are just alternate art cards. However, there isn’t anything special about them to make actual participation worth it. The art isn’t fantastic, nor are they full art.

 

As far as the future of the game is concerned, it looks as though they have at least a year’s worth of content planned. We had the Core Set 1 release this past February, with the next set due out in May and a third set in August. They have regional events planned for the summer, with a national event to be held at GenCon this year. So it could be said that Steve Jackson Games is definitely going all in on this title.

What is interesting to me, though, is still their reprint policy. It can be found here. I can understand keeping expansions limited after their initial release, but a core set? A core set for any new trading card game should be made readily available during its first year of release. The core set, along with your starters, should be where new players have access to any and all of the key cards that they need to obtain in order to get into the game. There are only two reasons not to do this and they both are bad. First, you’re attempting to create an artificial demand for your product. By creating the demand, you are able to keep the hype rolling for the following releases. This screams money grab, and is something mostly known to happen in trading card games where the company has an IP with limited time (See any of Score’s or Panini’s trading cards). The second, and most problematic, reason to do this is power creep. Each set following will get more and more powerful, making the previous set obsolete after release. Again, another way to force players to buy more and more product.

Final Thoughts and Verdict:

I like the Munchkin IP. It is stupid, silly fun. It is a game that I can get out with a group of friends and have a couple hours of mindless enjoyment. Sure, alliances are formed, backs have knives driven firmly down the middle, all in the name of kicking in that last door and hitting level ten first. That being said, most of the same enjoyment, or at least those feelings, can be had within the context of the Munchkin CCG as well. In a time were trading card games are a dime a dozen, and only the most serious or competitive last any time, it is nice to have a more laid back game to have in the deck bag.

I still have several reservations, namely in regards to the future of the game and the idea that this is a collectible card game with not much in way of “collectible”. The game is still too fresh to see the future clearly, so I hope I am wrong and the game delivers on the longitivtiy that the Munchkin brand is known for while, at the same time, giving us that collectible card game experience.

Game Play:
Pros:
-Simple and easy to learn.
-Cheating mechanic is an absolute riot in later turns when you have more gold to bluff with.
-Hero cards and archetypes make for fun builds.
Cons:
-Certain gameplay elements are not easily explained in the Quickstart guide, making certain concepts a bit awkward for new players.
-Gathering your resources at the end of your active turn make for some sticky situations.

Presentation:
Pros:
-The art work, while not phenomenal, fits the game’s legacy well.
-The full art variants are dynamic and a joy to add to the deck.
Cons:
-Lack of any type of foiling, or premium style card, distracts from the collectible aspect of the game. This is especially true for the organized play promo cards.
-The layout of the cards feels cheap. While easy to read, nothing really pops on the card.

Replayability:
Pros:
-The matches can go rather quickly, allowing for multiple games in a sort period.
-Currently, even with just the starters and Core Set 1, there are several potentially great builds. This leads to plenty of unique matches, and a game that doesn’t get stale.
Cons:
-The fear of the potential power creep makes it hard to get excited for future sets past this one.
-That’s really the only con, its a fun game to play!

Final Verdict: 7 out of 10

Honestly, the Munchkin CCG is a fun game. It really is. You can tell the designers had a blast making some of these cards and the interactions some cards have within their decks shows real thought beyond just using the Munchkin IP for a quick game. I will proudly keep my Warrior deck in my deck bag, along side my Cardfight! Vanguard and Magic the Gathering decks. What keeps this game from ranking higher for me is just the lack of thought into the “collectible” part of collectible card game, as well as the feeling that this will unfortunately be a cash grab attempt from Steve Jackson Games.

Ultimately, though, I do enjoy it and recommend it to every one looking for a quick, easy card game to play.

So, until next time, keep your dice warm and happy gaming!

It was bound to happen sooner or later, but we are finally starting to use our YouTube channel!

At the current moment, we only have a single video up. A single video we recorded at GenCon 50…seven months ago. Still, it is progress.

Our first recording is a quick unboxing video for the amazing game Campy Creatures, featuring guest gamer Kristina.

Our first unboxing!

Hopefully we’ll be doing more videos, and maybe live-streaming, in the future. Comment below what kind of videos you’d like to see, be them unboxing, Let’s Plays, or even deck profiles.

So until next time, keep your dice warm and happy gaming.

GenCon 2018!

Posted: February 10, 2018 in Uncategorized

That’s right, ladies and gentlemen. Late Night Players will be attending GenCon 2018!

Really not more to say beyond that.

We’ll hopefully be doing some recording and what have you onsite this year. So if you’re going to be at the show this year and would like to play some games with some kickass people, hit us up!

Until then, keep your dice warm and happy gaming!

This past Sunday, I was finally able to sit down and get my first real taste of WarMachine (and a little Hordes, too) since we purchased some starters back at GenCon 50.

I was playing a Retribution Of Scyrah build while my friend/teacher/way too patient Scott ran a Mercenary build. We decided on 50 points but I didn’t realize that there were fewer points than that in any of the starters I bought (especially the ones from Privateer Press’ Black Friday sale). So we ended up just doing Warcaster and Warjack vs Warcaster and Warjack.

And as with every game I’ve ever played against Scott, I was obliterated. Needless to say more practice, and more miniatures, are required!

These guys haven’t even been primered yet, but the weather has been too cold for any of that fun stuff. I have a pair of Trollbloods that I’ve been working on here and there that I started on before winter set in. Another friend gave me a starter to add to the fun and I figured I’d practice on them first.

Not too shabby if I do say so myself.

Anyways, keep your dice warm and happy gaming!

Well this was certainly a pleasant surprise. Knight Models has released character cards for their Suicide Squad box set for their DC Universe Miniatures Game. Well, just the Suicide Squad side. Still no rules regarding Batfleck, Joker or his crew. Still, this added 8 new characters from one game to another, effectively giving anyone who might only play the Batman Miniatures Game all they’d need to dive into the other rule set.





With a new team comes a new Team Ability card, too!


And curse them for teasing Amanda Waller and Enchantress. Both of them were listed in the Suicide Squad rule book but we’ve yet to see either of them yet. Heck, we’re still waiting on Raven and Grodd that we’re teased forever ago.

Anyways, as someone who broke into the BMG with the Suicide Squad box set (and awesome birthday present from my friends), this tiny little update it amazing to me. I now have an extra 7 figures (Flagg was released later and haven’t gotten him yet) to add to the table top.

Sound off in the comments below if you plan on running any/all of the Suicide Squad on your next game night.

Happy gaming!